Kids and Farm Life, a Match Made in Heaven

Our sons Jason (left) & Joshua (right) enjoying farm life.

I grew up in the country & loved every minute of it. We had goats, chickens, ducks, bunnies, a pony & of course cats & dogs. My brother, cousins & I were always riding our bikes down the dirt road, trying to catch turtles in the pond, riding 4 wheelers & making other priceless memories. I have always thought that a childhood spent in the country is special, especially when you’re lucky enough to share it with animals.

Jason & Joshua, farm life 🚜❤
Animals teach important life lessons, like eat your snacks up high so the goats can’t steal them!

Safety first!

Our kids love spending time with the animals. We teach them how to properly handle each kind of animal to make sure everyone stays safe.

We have 2 horses, Harvey (27 years old) & Bert (41 years old). They were both my childhood horses & are now enjoying retirement on our farm. Both horses are well trained & extremely gentle but horses are very big & very fast, which can be dangerous. Each horse weighs over 1,000 lbs so you can get hurt really bad, really fast, even if it’s just an accident. For those reasons we are especially careful with the horses. The kids are by no means scared of the horses but are taught to have a healthy respect for their size & strength.

Joshua talking to Bert, our 41 year old horse.
Jason grooming Bert

On the other hand, we also have very small animals that require extra care for their own safety. Our baby goats were less than 2 lbs each at birth. The boys were only allowed to hold them while they were sitting down so the baby goats wouldn’t be in danger of being dropped.

Kid people with their kid goats
Holding just-hatched baby chicks

Work ethic

Our kids are still young; Joshua turned 3 last week & Jason turns 5 this week. They both help around the farm with lots of chores like filling water buckets, measuring feed for the animals, sweeping and even cleaning stalls.

So we don’t have to do those things anymore since the kids do them, right?! Hahaha! No. They are still kids & still do kid things. Sometimes I find sticks floating in the water trough where they were pretending the sticks were boats. They help clean stalls for a few minutes then get distracted & have to have a scooter race. They also like making ‘concrete’ in my buckets by mixing sand, rocks, water, goat poop; you know, whatever they find. We always have to go behind them & finish the chores but they are still learning & we greatly appreciate their effort.

Joshua, helping around the farm when he had just turned a year old.
Jason helping me clean the barn. He is 4 years old in this picture.

Unique experiences

Of course there are some experiences that farm kids get to have that are unique to country life. Most kids would beg for candy at the checkout line but when you’re at the feed store during Chick Days, you may impulse buy a box of baby chicks.

Jason with his box of baby chicks.
Goat kisses

And what could be more fun than riding around a store on a cart full of several hundred pounds of livestock feed? Riding on that cart with your best friend, your partner in crime, your brother.

Best friends, partners in crime, brothers. ❤❤

 

They’re finally here: Baby goats!

Clean sheet night for the goats

Silly

The stalls were clean & I had put down fresh bedding. The birthing kit was ready with clean towels & way more supplies than I would (hopefully) need. My trusty goat books, a ton of notes, & extra camera batteries were on standby.

We were thrilled to meet the newest addition(s) to our farm. Would it be twins? Triplets? More? Or just a single baby? Boys or girls? Both? I was just hoping for an uneventful delivery, healthy babies & a healthy mama goat.

Silly when she was pregnant with Teddy Graham

We are extremely fortunate to have a wonderful veterinarian hospital in our area who treats goats. Most vets will not treat goats in their practice even if they treat other livestock like cows or horses. This was my first time being a midwife at any birth so I was pretty nervous, but it eased my mind to have a great vet just a call away.

Luckily everything went really well & suprisingly quick. Silly gave birth to 2 healthy bucklings (baby boys) that we named Teddy & Graham. Both boys were up & nursing within minutes of being born.

Graham was first to be born (right, being cleaned up by mama) & Teddy arrived shortly after (left, nursing for the first time).
2 healthy baby boys! Teddy & Graham, born August 25, 2016

Charlotte

Just 5 days later, Charlotte went into labor. It was thundering & pouring rain. The sound of heavy rain on the barn’s tin roof made it impossible to hear anything else. As soon as I ran into the barn Charlotte laid down & started pushing. Soon she delivered a beautiful black & white, blue-eyed doeling (baby girl!) that we named Sprinkles.

Sprinkles, just moments after being born

I was very excited (& surprised!) that they both had their babies in front of me instead of waiting until I wasn’t around. Usually animals of prey, such as horses & goats, wait until they are alone to give birth. It made me feel pretty great that they trusted me enough to have the babies while I was in the pen with them.

Me & Graham. I’m obviously a little excited over holding my first baby goat.

I may post the actual goat birthing pics in another post with a warning in the title since the pictures are graphic & not everyone enjoys that kind of thing! 😆

 

 

Chickens: the gateway drug to the livestock world.

A silkie chick

The barn has always been my happy place. The smell of hay, the sound of silence, the escape from the pressures of society, & of course my best friends live there, horses. I still enjoyed taking care of my horses & spending time with them but I was also constantly reminded of my limitations. No riding, no jumping, no competing, no shooting guns on horseback & playing cowgirl. This made me pretty depressed. I had no idea what non-horse people did with all of their time. I’m certainly not the type that will be happy & fulfilled by spending my time indoors.

My boys Harvey & Bert, enjoying retirement

I still loved my barn time but felt like something was missing. One day my husband surprised me by bringing home a small chirping box from the feed store. Inside were 6 little fluffy-butt baby chicks! I was in shock because I’m ALWAYS the one bringing home animals & my husband is the voice of reason (‘what exactly are you going to do with 2 feral donkeys?’ Ok, he had a point).

I let the chicks loose in our bathtub & hung a light over them to keep them warm. My husband quickly remembered why he should have surprised me with flowers instead. I started googling ‘baby chick care’ & was soon flooded by too much information & too many opinions. Oh no, chicken people are just as crazy as horse people!! I was stunned yet relieved, I will fit in just fine in the poultry enthusiast world.

The 6 chicks that started my addiction when they were about 3 months old. And yes, they are riding a Tonka truck!

Of course neither my husband nor I had any idea that chickens were like a gateway drug into the livestock world. I soon wanted more chickens. Who knew they came in so many colors & patterns?

They were actually pretty entertaining too. I don’t know about you but watching a chicken leap out of your lap & snag a wasp out of the air is pretty impressive. Bonus: I’m allergic to wasps! Did that chicken save my life? Probably not but it was still pretty amazing to witness.

My chickens are obsessed with mowing time. When you start the mower they will stampede towards you, then follow you up & down each row, eating every bug that is unearthed. Pretty sure they think of our mower as a big Pez dispenser.

Of course my flock grew very quickly thanks to the feed store. Every Spring the livestock feed stores & hardware stores get in hundreds of adorable baby chicks. They cleverly place them between the entrance & the feed section so you are overwhelmed by cuteness when you just need a bag of feed. But you can’t buy just one! Most stores have a minimum purchase of 6 chicks so they can keep each other warm, or keep each other company, or just increase the store’s revenue. Either way your flock will grow by leaps & cheeps in no time.

I went to the store for a bag of feed & came home with these little fuzz balls.

The chickens that you already have are determined to increase their numbers as well. I collect eggs every day & try to discourage broody hens (those are the hens that try to hatch eggs). Every once in awhile they will succeed in hiding a nest then parade around with another 8 or so baby chicks about 21 days later. Is it adorable? Yes. Does it increase your feed bill? Absolutely.

We went out of town & came back to a broody hen on a hidden nest. She increased our flock by 7 just a few days later!

Of course if you have a small coop & keep your chickens locked in that coop at all times you won’t be dealing with hidden nests (or a daily Easter egg hunt). We free-range our chickens during the day & only lock them up at night so they lay eggs all over the place (except in the variety of nesting boxes I made).

One of the chicken’s favorite nesting sites, in my hay feeders.
The flock stampeding when I let them out of their coop for the day.

My flock started outgrowing our acreage so I rehomed a few chickens to some good friends. Don’t worry, we still have enough chickens to make the neighbors give us weird looks.