How we turned a carport into a barn

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It happens to the best of us. You start out with a few chickens (the gateway drug to the livestock world) then soon start experimenting with other animals. A donkey? A goat? Sheep? Potbelly pigs? Emu?! The sky is the limit! Who knows what will show up on your property. That’s part of the fun (for me anyway, but probably not as fun for my husband who gets to build their homes).

The horses have their own barn but there wasn’t enough room for the goats. After all, the herd just went from 2 goats to 5 goats. They more than doubled their numbers in less than a week & needed their own space. Well played, goats.

I started searching Pinterest for goat barn ideas & of course was not disappointed. There were so many creative  barns made out of many different materials. Then I saw  something that caught my eye: a carport turned into a barn. It was cute & looked so easy to build (hahaha!! Spoiler alert, it’s not as easy as it looks).

24×24 carport.

We eventually landed a used carport & set it up in the corner of the pasture. According to my expertise all we had to do was tack up some plywood & cut a few windows & doors. My husband (a contractor) quickly burst my bubble with reality. Yep, he was going to do it the right way so the barn wouldn’t blow away in the first storm. After all we live in hurricane alley (& he knows how much I worry about my animals) so he made a valid point.

We hooked up the trailer & took a trip to the home improvement store. One of my favorite places to go! Seriously, I have this thing where I think I can build anything, probably because I watch too much HGTV. My husband is never too excited in those stores because he frequents them for work.

We started to load up sheets of plywood, 4’x4’s, concrete, screws for metal, screws for wood, some kind of metal strap things, some giant screw things, & other stuff they don’t talk much about on HGTV. After paying an eye-opening total at the register, we loaded up our loot & headed to the barn.

Just some of the materials from the home improvement store. Those are sheets of 3/4” treated plywood & they are heavy! Our son was more than willing to help.
My husband (left) & stepdad (right) working on the goat barn while supervisor Sprinkles makes sure their work is up to snuff.

We laid 4’x4’ treated wood posts on their sides on the ground then set the carport on top of those posts (with the help of the tractor!). This was done to keep the bottom of the carport from direct ground contact & hopefully extend the life of the metal. Large bolts were drilled through the metal & into the 4’x4’ to keep everything in place.

You can see the carport sitting on top of the 4’x4’ wood posts.

The plywood walls were attached to the frame of the carport with 1.5” self-tapping metal screws. This part was way harder than I thought it would be. The 3/4” plywood was pretty heavy (even heavier because it was rained on & therefore added quite a bit of water weight) & awkward to handle. The hardest part was driving a few hundred metal screws through the plywood & into the steel frame. It should probably be a new CrossFit class.

Bottom row of plywood finished & 4’x4’ wood posts up.

Next we put up two 4’x4’ treated wood posts on each end of the barn. These would serve as a support for the barn doors that would be added later. The 4’x4’ posts are 12’ long. We dug a 2’ deep hole with post hole diggers for each post, set the post in the hole, made sure the post was straight & level, then poured a 40# bag of concrete in each hole.

Framing started on the ends of the barn.
More framing on the ends of the barn & the second row of plywood finished.

Unfortunately we were interrupted by a hurricane before we could finish the barn doors. We boarded up the unfinished parts with plywood & screws then used anchors to secure the barn to the ground.

The anchors that we used to secure the barn to the ground. These were attached to the frame of the barn with bolts, screws & washers.

After the storm passed, my stepdad made custom Dutch doors to go on each end of the barn.

The Dutch doors are up! My husband also cut windows into the barn for more airflow & ventilation.

I couldn’t be happier with how the goat barn turned out. Of course we added a few things after we thought we were done (doesn’t that always seem to be the case?). Extra windows, vents, whitewash, a chicken coop, sand – you get the picture. I’ll share the upgrades that we did in a later post.

Please let me know if you have any questions & I’ll do my best to help!

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